A perfect life

There is smoke in the air again today, so instead of the patio I am comfortably ensconced on the living room couch. Since we've hardly used this room all summer it feels odd and is a distinct reminder that winter, and use of the fireplace, aren't far off. The week ahead promises to be rainy, which adds to the sense of summer's end.

While I write Ray is in the "back room" watching a rerun of a bike race in Spain. Both of us are enjoying this day without plans because the week has been unusually busy. Tuesday it was the bath aide and a sitter, so I could run errands for three hours. Wednesday it was two women to talk about the caregiver study I agreed to participate in (my contribution to science). Thursday brought a speech therapist to check on Ray's swallowing (one of the symptoms of Lewy body). Among other things she suggested thickened water. Ick. Friday was the bath aide again, plus a PT to help with transfers. She watched as I helped Ray move from chair to couch, and said my technique was excellent. I felt like a kid getting an unexpected A.

All this attention to illness is not unexpected but it lays bare how much our life is consumed by it. As Ray grows less able to care for himself I take up the slack, but while I grow more intimately aware of his most basic needs, I understand less and less of his thinking. The two issues are on divergent paths and the distances between them grow daily. Communication suffers, of course, but I have learned to shorten my sentences, to cease sharing complicated topics, to hear silence in answer to questions. Instead of talking to Ray I talk out loud to myself, and sometimes wonder if I too am not losing all sense.

Next week the every-other-week nurse will return, as will the bath aide and the PT—this time to work on car transfers. All bring a whiff of the outside world with them along with their help and conversation. I will be here, chopping wood and carrying water, and living in the now with Ray and the cat. It is not an exciting life, but it is not to be disparaged. It is the perfect life for me, at this moment, now.